kiki-kit

loualyne:

sweetmadameblue:

theouijagirl:

kerplunkers:

hypo-thermic:

yogaboi:

toocooltobehipster:

To donate £5 to the charity supporting the male victims of domestic abuse, text the message: MKDV46 to 70070
Click here to watch the video

At first I though this was a joke

Don’t ignore this Tumblr

Yet they still do even when it’s right in their face.

This reminds me of how a friend of mine was abused by the mother of his child. She was mentally unstable and used to berate him constantly and would smack him in the head all the time. It really pissed me off. Then one night she threw hot coffee in his face and tried to stab him with a screwdriver. The cops hauled him off to jail because she made up a sob story that painted herself as the victim. 

Once he left her, he stayed with me and it was a nightmare. She stalked him and me. She would drive by my house obsessively at all hours of the day and night (her muffler made a weird sound so I know it was her). She started showing up at my job, showing up at the places I frequented around town, and filling up my voicemail with dead air. The cops were no help.

One day she got bold enough to talk her way into my home by conning my elderly grandmother, whom I was taking care of, while I was out. She went in my room and went through my stuff (creepy), then found him napping on the couch and attacked him. My grandmother witnessed the whole thing. He grabbed her by the arms, forced her out the front door, and locked it. The cops were called again. They said they’d go and ‘talk’ to her.

The next day we were watching a movie and there was a knock at the door. The police had come to arrest him. She filed a complaint against him and shown off some bruises on her arms from the altercation that she swore were completely unprovoked. My grandmother saw the whole thing since she was in the living room too and testified on his behalf. He still ended up serving jail time.
No one takes male domestic violence victims seriously. They only see males as perpetrators.

    

^

neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

How the brain stabilizes its connections in order to learn better
Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. However, in order for learning to leave a trace, connections must be stabilized. A team at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) discovered a new cellular mechanism involved in the long-term stabilization of neuron connections, in which non-neuronal cells, called astrocytes, play a role unidentified until now. These results, published in Current Biology, will lead to a better understanding of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.
The central nervous system excitatory synapses – points of contact between neurons that allow them to transmit signals – are highly dynamic structures, which are continuously forming and dissolving. They are surrounded by non-neuronal cells, or glial cells, which include the distinctively star-shaped astrocytes. These cells form complex structures around synapses, and play a role in the transmission of cerebral information which was widely unknown before.
Plasticity and Stability
By increasing neuronal activity through whiskers stimulation of adult mice, the scientists were able to observe, in both the somatosensory cortex and the hippocampus, that this increased neuronal activity provokes an increase in astrocytes movements around synapses. The synapses, surrounded by astrocytes, re-organise their architecture, which protects them and increases their longevity. The team of researchers led by Dominique Muller, Professor in the Department of Fundamental Neuroscience of the Faculty of Medicine at UNIGE, developed new techniques that allowed them to specifically “control” the different synaptic structures, and to show that the phenomenon took place exclusively in the connections between neurons involved in learning. “In summary, the more the astrocytes surround the synapses, the longer the synapses last, thus allowing learning to leave a mark on memory,” explained Yann Bernardinelli, the lead author on this study.
This study identifies a new, two-way interaction between neurons and astrocytes, in which the learning process regulates the structural plasticity of astrocytes, who in turn determine the fate of the synapses. This mechanism indicates that astrocytes apparently play an important role in the processes of learning and memory, which present abnormally in various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases, among which Alzheimer’s, autism, or Fragile X syndrome.
This discovery highlights the until now underestimated importance of cells which, despite being non-neuronal, participate in a crucial way in the cerebral mechanisms that allow us to learn and retain memories of what we have learned.

neurosciencestuff:

How the brain stabilizes its connections in order to learn better

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. However, in order for learning to leave a trace, connections must be stabilized. A team at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) discovered a new cellular mechanism involved in the long-term stabilization of neuron connections, in which non-neuronal cells, called astrocytes, play a role unidentified until now. These results, published in Current Biology, will lead to a better understanding of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.

The central nervous system excitatory synapses – points of contact between neurons that allow them to transmit signals – are highly dynamic structures, which are continuously forming and dissolving. They are surrounded by non-neuronal cells, or glial cells, which include the distinctively star-shaped astrocytes. These cells form complex structures around synapses, and play a role in the transmission of cerebral information which was widely unknown before.

Plasticity and Stability

By increasing neuronal activity through whiskers stimulation of adult mice, the scientists were able to observe, in both the somatosensory cortex and the hippocampus, that this increased neuronal activity provokes an increase in astrocytes movements around synapses. The synapses, surrounded by astrocytes, re-organise their architecture, which protects them and increases their longevity. The team of researchers led by Dominique Muller, Professor in the Department of Fundamental Neuroscience of the Faculty of Medicine at UNIGE, developed new techniques that allowed them to specifically “control” the different synaptic structures, and to show that the phenomenon took place exclusively in the connections between neurons involved in learning. “In summary, the more the astrocytes surround the synapses, the longer the synapses last, thus allowing learning to leave a mark on memory,” explained Yann Bernardinelli, the lead author on this study.

This study identifies a new, two-way interaction between neurons and astrocytes, in which the learning process regulates the structural plasticity of astrocytes, who in turn determine the fate of the synapses. This mechanism indicates that astrocytes apparently play an important role in the processes of learning and memory, which present abnormally in various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases, among which Alzheimer’s, autism, or Fragile X syndrome.

This discovery highlights the until now underestimated importance of cells which, despite being non-neuronal, participate in a crucial way in the cerebral mechanisms that allow us to learn and retain memories of what we have learned.

wearebut2tardust

fuzzlock:

escapedgoat:

kjerstifaret:

A comic about why witches are stereotyped as riding broom: 

Apparently once upon a time there was an ointment one could rub on a broom - that was most popular amongst herbalists (such as many witches) - that was a hallucinogenic. One would ride the broom for masturbating purposes and the ointment would be absorbed through the mucus membrane of the vagina and give the rider a sensation of flying.

Now you will never look at Quidditch the same way again. 

OO_OO

Now i really want one.